LAND USE AND LAND COVER CHANGE OF HIGH TOCANTINS RIVER BASIN (GOIAS, BRAZIL): INFLUENCE OF PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS AND THE RELATION WITH THE INDIGENOUS COMMUNITIES

Patrick Thomaz de Aquino Martins, Renata Mariana Póvoa Matos, Alines Francisca Bueno, Alessandra Carla Silva Sene Paixão

Abstract


The aim of this study is to analyze the land use and land cover in the upper Tocantins river basin, Goias state, based on the spatial changes in the range of 29 years, the influence of the physical aspects of its dynamic and its impacts on indigenous communities. The methodology was based on GIS techniques and literature. The spatial area was defined from the processing of digital eleva tion models (DEM), in reference to the drainage basin confluent to “Serra da Mesa” hydroelectric plant (HEP), northern state of Goiás . Landsat 5 and 8 satelite images were used, which were preprocessed, classified and highlighted. The characterization of the physical environment was carried from the compilation of thematic maps (geological units, geomorphic units and soils) and the MDE. To associate the indigenous community, literature search was performed, searching the literature, publications related to the recent history of Indigenous Territories in the area. The classification resulted in a land cover and land use map with three classes: Cerrado, Anthropogenic cover and Water bodies. Over the past 29 years there was a change in predominant class, from cerrado to anthropogenic cover. This alterations occupy, mainly, areas of Oxisols in flat reliefs, in regional planation surface. In the same period, the scenario of landscapes transformation hit two indigenous communities: the Avá - Canoeiro, with the emergence of HEP, and the Tapuia by land pressure. This spatial configuration directs the conservation of Cerrado remaining (fragments) present in the study area.

Keywords


geoprocessamento; paisagem; dinâmica espacial



DOI: https://doi.org/10.5902/2179460X15780

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