Large Eddy Simulation of the Interaction Between Biogenic Volatile Organic Compound Transport and Chemistry within a Topical Forest Canopy

Authors

  • Tobias Gerken Department of Meteorology, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, USA
  • Marcelo Chamecki Department of Meteorology, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, USA
  • Jose Fuentes Department of Meteorology, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, USA

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.5902/2179460X21577

Keywords:

Large eddy simulation. Atmospheric chemistry. BVOC. Ozone. Forest canopies.

Abstract

A multitude of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) are emitted within the canopy air-space of tropical forests. These compounds undergo reactions with atmospheric oxidants (eg. Ozone O3, the nitrate NO3 or the hydroxyl OH radicals), which mainly originate above the canopy, and reaction products can subsequently condense to form secondary organic aerosols. Canopy resolving Large Eddy Simulation (LES) combined with a representation of atmospheric chemistry presents a valuable tool for a better understanding of the interaction between chemistry and transport processes. This requires the adequate resolution of concentration fields of reactants (BVOCs and oxidants) as well as the flow field inside the canopy. We present the results of an LES study with 17 layers inside the forest (2 m vertical resolution), which includes a simplified BVOC chemistry in order to estimate the export of BVOCs and their principal reaction products such as methyl vinyl ketone (MVK) and methacrolein (MACR) from a tropical canopy. These results are compared to field measurements of ozone, nitrogen oxides, isoprene, monoterpenes as well as MVK and MACR observed during a field campaign at the Cuieiras Biological Reserve K34 (2°36’32” S, 60° 12’33” W) tower from April 2014 to January 2015.


Downloads

Download data is not yet available.

References

Andreae, M.O., (2009). A new look at aging aerosols. Science 326, 1493–1494.

Chamecki, M., Meneveau, C., Parlange, M.B., (2008). A hybrid spectral/ finite-volume algorithm for Large-Eddy Simulation of scalars in the atmospheric boundary layer. Boundary-Layer Meteorology 128, 473-484.

Kruijt, B., Malhi, Y., Lloyd, J., Norbre, A.D., Miranda, A.C., Pereira, M.G.P., Culf, A., Grace, J., (2000). Turbulence statistics above and within two Amazon rain forest canopies. Boundary-Layer Meteorology 94, 297–331.

Ouwersloot, H.G., de Arellano, J.V., H. van Stratum, B.J., Krol, M.C., Lelieveld, J., (2013). Quantifying the transport of subcloud layer mreactants by shallow cumulus clouds over the Amazon. Journal of Geophysical Research 118, 13041–13059.

Shaw, R.H., Schumann, U., (1992). Large-eddy simulation of turbulent flow above and within a forest. Boundary-Layer Meteorology 61, 47–64.

Tóta, J., Fitzjarrald, D.R., da Silva Dias, M.A.F., (2012). Amazon rainforest exchange of carbon and subcanopy air flow: Manaus LBA site—A complex terrain condition. The Scientific World Journal 2012, 1–19

Published

2016-07-20

How to Cite

Gerken, T., Chamecki, M., & Fuentes, J. (2016). Large Eddy Simulation of the Interaction Between Biogenic Volatile Organic Compound Transport and Chemistry within a Topical Forest Canopy. Ciência E Natura, 38, 262–265. https://doi.org/10.5902/2179460X21577

Most read articles by the same author(s)